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Google Is Working on Its Own Blockchain-Related Technology

Google Is Working on Its Own Blockchain-Related Technology

  • Alphabet division developing a distributed digital ledger
  • Company insiders say cloud is natural home for the technology

What’s Coming in the Year Ahead

Google is working on blockchain-related technology to support its cloud business and head off competition from emerging startups that use the heavily-hyped technology to operate online in new ways, according to people familiar with the situation. Companies use blockchain and other so-called digital ledgers to securely record transactions and process other data over the internet — a service Google could use, for example, to reassure customers that their information is protected when stored on the giant network of computer servers that power its cloud services.

The Alphabet Inc. unit is developing its own distributed digital ledger that third parties can use to post and verify transactions, one of the people said. Although the timing of any product release is unclear, the company plans to offer this to differentiate its cloud service from rivals. It will also provide a white-label version that other companies can run on their own servers, the person added. The internet giant has also been acquiring and investing in startups with digital ledger expertise. Many of the deals haven’t been announced, the person said. Still, Alphabet was a leading corporate investor in the field last year, ahead of Citigroup Inc. and Goldman Sachs Group Inc., according to research firm CB Insights.

Several people in Google’s infrastructure group, which reports to cloud chief Diane Greene, have been tinkering with blockchain protocols in recent months, according to another person familiar with the company. Other Google insiders said recently that the cloud business is a natural place for blockchain-related services. The people asked not to be identified talking about the subject because the company isn’t ready to make an announcement yet. “Like many new technologies, we have individuals in various teams exploring potential uses of blockchain but it’s way too early for us to speculate about any possible uses or plans,” a Google spokesman said.

In 2016, Google started a trial for developers testing blockchain services on its cloud. The company is now exploring much more expansive ways to deploy the technology, the people said. Digital ledgers like blockchain power Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. They are databases that are updated regularly across thousands of computers over the internet. Each entry is confirmed by these machines, which can be part of public networks or run privately by companies. There are different kinds of digital ledgers — blockchain is only one. Data crunched by this technology range from transactions to supply-chain updates to digital cats.

The technology presents challenges and opportunities for Google. Distributed networks of computers that run digital ledgers can eliminate risks that come with information held centrally by a single company. While Google’s security is strong, it’s one of the largest holders of information in the world. The decentralized approach is also beginning to support new online services that compete with Google.

Still, the company is an internet pioneer and has long experience embracing new and open web standards. To build its ledger, Google has looked at technology from the Hyperledger consortium, but it could opt for another type that may be easier to scale to run millions of transactions, one of the people familiar with the situation said.

"Any time there’s a paradigm shift like this, there’s an opportunity for new giants to emerge — but also for incumbents to adopt the new approach," said Elad Gil, a startup investor who worked on early mobile projects at Google more than a decade ago. Sridhar Ramaswamy, Google’s advertising chief, said at a recent conference that his division has a "small team" looking at blockchain, but noted the existing core technology can’t handle a lot of transactions quickly. Some marketing firms have started to explore blockchain’s potential to facilitate digital ad buying without using Google and Facebook Inc., the two dominant industry players.

When Alphabet wants to keep up with emerging technology, it often backs startups in the field and makes small acquisitions to recruit talent. GV, Alphabet’s venture capital arm, has invested in wallet service Blockchain Luxembourg, financial transactions network Ripple, cryptocurrency asset management platform LedgerX, international payments provider Veem and the now-defunct Buttercoin, according to CB Insights.

Among tech giants, IBM and Microsoft Corp. have so far led the charge in offering blockchain-related tools and letting companies tinker with digital ledgers using their cloud services. The market for blockchain products and services may grow from $706 million last year to more than $60 billion in 2024, according to WinterGreen Research. Cloud’s 800-pound gorilla, Amazon.com Inc., helps companies build blockchain applications, and Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg is looking at cryptocurrencies, encryption and other decentralized computing approaches.

A slew of startups are trying to challenge Google’s online dominance by using digital ledgers. Brave is a web browser that competes with Google’s Chrome. Instead of running targeted ads, Brave uses blockchain technology to pay websites when people spend time there. BitClave lets people perform searches online, and get rewarded for seeing ads. Another project, Presearch, is also using blockchain to try to compete with Google’s search engine, according to a white paper by the startup. "You’re going to see an unbelievable amount of R&D expenditures go into this," said Jeff Richards, a managing partner at venture firm GGV Capital. "Everybody learned from the internet and mobile that you can’t afford to wait."

Chuck Reynolds


Marketing Dept
Contributor

Please click either Link to learn more about Bitcoin.
Interested or have Questions, Call Me, 559-474-4614

Thomas Prendergast

How Do The CMOs Of PayPal, HireVue, Ogilvy And Comedy Central Structure Their Marketing Teams?

How Do The CMOs Of PayPal, HireVue, Ogilvy And Comedy Central Structure Their Marketing Teams?

Department structure all depends on the needs of the organization,
 
company culture, and the strategy the team is using to reach its customers. It’s actually one of the most difficult decisions CMOs will make—how to structure their department. You can’t pilot a new structure or test it. And few CMOs have a lot of experience in restructuring departments making it an even greater challenge. To better understand how different firms structure their marketing organizations, I turned to Josh Steimle, CEO of digital marketing agency MWI. Through in-depth interviews, Steimle learned how the chief marketers of PayPal, HireVue, Ogilvy & Mather and Comedy Central structure their marketing teams. Below are thoughts from Steimle and quotes from his book, Chief Marketing Officers at Work.

Kimberly Whitler:

How does PayPal organize marketing?

Josh Steimle:

At PayPal, the marketing team is split into consumer, digital and traditional as the team is fairly consumer focused and also allocates quite a bit of resources on digital. “There’s a team that focuses on consumer strategy around the seasonal, quarterly, and annual consumer marketing planning. There’s a focus on consumer segments, one of which is new customer journey. Another, for example, would be around the youth market or highly engaged customers,” said Patrick Adams, Head of Consumer Marketing.

“The next team is a pure digital team that focuses on a best-in- class digital acquisition discipline [display affiliates, SEO, SEM], and digital experience optimization. There is a priority to optimize all of our digital properties, whether it be the dot-com, the mobile site, or the app. True end-to- end optimization.” Besides consumer strategy and digital, Adams said that his marketing department is home to a third team that handles more of the traditional side of things. “The last team is a traditional marketing services team that is responsible for marketing ops, project management, database management, creative, and QA that services all of North America,” he said.

Whitler:

Is the structure different at a smaller firm—HireVue?

Steimle:

At HireVue, marketing team structure is dictated by its core functions. Former HireVue CMO, Kevin Marasco (currently CMO of Zenefits) said that his marketing team structure is dependent on the company’s strategic focus. “Our core functions are demand marketing, solid content, digital, and web. We have a field and corporate marketing team that does events, promotions and creative services. The product marketing team does all the product marketing, a bit of intelligence, etcetera. Then, we have a go-to- market team, which takes everything and is responsible for the field enablement of our sales team, services team,” he said.

In addition to their PR and communications team, Marasco said that they’re also focusing efforts on a newly-minted team that handles customer advocacy. “That’s a huge, newer area of marketing that we’re focused on—once we land an account, continuing to drive advocacy, expansion, renewals, referrals, and things like that. We also have a social marketing function, which is another newer area, relatively speaking, for marketers. You used to see social placed in corporate comms, digital, demand, or even HR.” he said. “We now have a broader focus on social. We’re trying to integrate it into all aspects of the business—social selling, social marketing, services and support.”

Whitler:

How does a behemoth like Ogilvy organize its marketing function?

Steimle:

Ogilvy has a director of content that handles all specialized functions. At Ogilvy & Mather, Senior Partner and Global CMO Lauren Crampsie has a right hand man that handles all things content. “Right now, there’s the centralized global structure, which has a managing director of content, Nikolaj Birjukow. That’s a new position I built particularly for him about two years ago. Nikolaj is my number two on the marketing side and he oversees all of the specialized functions within marketing,” she said.

What Birjukow does is oversee all of Ogilvy’s social media and community management, which also includes the company’s web developers, UX designers and all editorial staff. “Nikolaj also oversees our internal communication staff—the staff that oversees our internal Internet—and how we communicate with our employees. My MD oversees that staff as well. It’s a real content marketing-driven team. I have a worldwide editorial director, Jeremy Katz. I think Ogilvy was the first agency ever to do a content partnership with a publication. We did one with Fast Company about two years ago,” she said. This is because Crampsie is a big believer in content marketing and brands as publishers and so she structures the marketing team (editorial team included) around that philosophy.

As Ogilvy operates hundreds of offices around the world, Crampsie said that of course local marketing teams are structured according to who is running it. PR however is decentralized at the local level. “The only central PR function is me, so I personally take on any big global announcements, crisis management, or anything of that nature because I think it’s the most effective way. In many cases—especially with social media and the Internet, where it’s so hard to control anything—having somebody of my seniority and my tenure take that on personally is the quickest way to get results at the global level,” she said.

Whitler:

Lastly, how does Comedy Central organize their marketing activities?

Steimle:

Comedy Central does all their creative work and advertising in-house. At Comedy Central, Former Executive Vice President and CMO Walter Levitt (currently President of CMOish) shares that most resources are allocated towards their creative team as they do all of their creative work and advertising fully in-house. “In our creative team, we have a large team of writer-producers. We have a large team of designers and a large team of copywriters. They are working every day to do the best work from an editorial and design point of view for the brand. They are working to create all the advertising, all the campaigns around our content,” he said.

In addition, Levitt said that Comedy Central also employs a brand marketing team that’s responsible for overall marketing strategy, media planning and buying. “We are big buyers of other people’s media, and that brand marketing team is responsible for all that media planning and buying. Tucked in there is our social media marketing, which is handled by some combination of all the groups,” he said.

Chuck Reynolds


Marketing Dept
Contributor

Please click either Link to learn more about Marketing.
Interested or have Questions, Call Me, 559-474-4614

Thomas Prendergast

Make $9K to $2M in Bitcoin in 1 year. No Investment

Make $9000 to $2M in Bitcoin a year with no investment

 

 

LEARN ABOUT CRYPTO FAUCETS

From wikipedia:   “Faucets are a great way to help introduce new people to bitcoin, or to altcoins. A majority of faucets provide information to new users as well as offering them some free coins so that they can ‘try before they buy’, experimenting with a test transaction or two before putting real money on the line. Since this whole experience is so new and a bit complicated to people, who perhaps don’t quite trust it with their hard money, this is a beneficial way to promote digital currency and bring in new users.”

How much can you make on Coinpot in one year? 
It’s a fair question. People want to know how much they can make before investing the time. I understand.

The answer is, it depends. There’s a wide range. Based on my model you can make as little as $900 or as much as $2 million in 1 year. It depends on a variety of factors including the original claim amount, the number of times you claim a day, the number of referrals you have, the number of times your referrals claim a day, loyalty days and a number of other factors, not to mention the price of crypto.

I had to create a calculator to figure it all out. Within the calculator, I’ve created scenarios that help to understand how the different factors above can impact your daily claim amount. These scenarios are labeled min, mid and max. The min scenario represents the person who puts forth the least amount of effort. The max scenario models out the power user with the highest amount of activity. The mid scenario is somewhere in between.

Here’s a quick slide to help explain each scenario:

In other words, Min activity is just mailing it in with one click a day. Mid activity is someone with 100 referrals making between 25 and 48 claims a day, and Max activity is someone who’s maxing out every claim. I like to the think of Min as a lower limit, Max as an upper limit and Mid as an average.

Next, I annualized the daily claim amount from each faucet calculator under each scenario, made a forecast of cryptocurrencies one year from today and these are the results.

The Results

The first set of results provides an estimate of how much you can make if crypto prices remain the same as they are today.

As you can see from the boxes highlighted in yellow, the minimum amount you can make is around $900, the middle point is around $10K and the max is almost $70K.

So, another way to interpret the results is:

  • If you’re just mailing it in with 1 claim a day for the rest of the year and have no referrals, you can make $900, providing prices remain the same.
  • If you make 24–48 claims per day with 100 referrals doing the same thing, you can make $10K, providing prices remain the same.
  • If you make max claims per day (58–288) with 500 referrals doing the same thing, you can make $70K, providing prices remain the same.

The thing about crypto is that the price does not stay the same. As much as I like free money, I wouldn’t be advising you to do this for $900 a year — though that’s nothing to sneeze at, especially if it’s free. Early investors of Bitcoin paid just $.06 for a Bitcoin. A $100 investment seven years ago would be worth $28 million today. It is highly unlikely that crypto prices in one year will be what they are today.

What if crypto prices grew 30% on average? The following chart shows what happens to the value of your crypto holdings if crypto prices at the end of 2018 are 30% higher than they are today.

  • If you’re just mailing it in with 1 claim a day for the rest of the year and have no referrals, you can make $1,100, with a 30% increase in prices.
  • If you make 24–48 claims per day with 100 referrals doing the same thing, you can make ~$13K, with a 30% increase in prices.
  • If you make max claims per day (58–288) with 500 referrals doing the same thing, you can make ~$90K, with a 30% increase in prices.

This is amazing, but again, I wouldn’t be telling you to do this for $1,100. The reason people are interested in cryptos, the reason why people are taking out a mortgage on their home (DO NOT DO THAT) to invest in cryptocurrency is that of the exponential growth rates. Bitcoin, Dash, Litecoin and Dogecoin all grew by 1326%, 5935%, 5215% and 3916%, respectively, over the last year (Bitcoin Cash just started in late July/early Aug.).

This chart shows a more likely scenarion with a 500% growth rate (but experts all agree that a 1000% – 1400% rate is more likely)

This is amazing growth and there’s a chance it won’t ever happen again, but cryptos have been on a growth trend for the past five years so I don’t think last year was a fluke. Here’s a chart showing the pace of growth in the crypto market over the last 4 years.

As you can see, market capitalization grew from $4.3 billion in 2014 to $221 billion in 2017. 2014 was a bad year, but all other years saw phenomenal gains. Now that the word is out about the value of cryptos, I believe the growth trend will continue to grow exponentially.

So what if the cryptos in your Coinpot portfolio grow at the same level they grew at last year in 2018? These are the results:

  • If you’re just mailing it in with 1 claim a day for the rest of the year and have no referrals, you can make $13K if prices grow the same rate as they did last year.
  • If you make 24–48 claims per day with 100 referrals doing the same thing, you can make ~$240K if prices grow the same rate as they did last year.
  • If you make max claims per day (58–288) with 500 referrals doing the same thing, you can make ~$2 million if prices grow the same rate as they did last year. Note: there is no max on referrals so this could be higher.

Cryptos may not be able to keep up the bull run they had last year, but if they do it means you could be sitting on a nice portfolio of crypto by the end of the year without spending a dime.

Cliff High: “Bitcoin can reach $100,000 in 2018”

Cliff High’s web bots are predicting bitcoin to reach $64.000 in the first half of 2018 and probably going higher than that to even $100.000.

At this point this prediction might sound a little crazy to you… if you think about his last prediction, it isn’t that weird at all!

Last year when Bitcoin was around $800 he predicted Bitcoin would hit $13.880 in February 2018 according to the data sets. He still believes that this is going to be true. He said that this would be the price by February 2018, even when he knew it would go higher than that. And it did. It almost hit $20.000.

The $13.800 price is a new base to steady take off again and rise! The $64.000 is the new base to take off to a new ATH in 2018. Before we go past 64, we will get a pull back into the mid 40’s.

So the future does look bright for Bitcoin and cryptocurrency in general. Other big coins like Litecoin, Dash, Monero, Ethereum, and so on will keep going up along with Bitcoin.

Here’s a quick overview slide of all three price scenarios.

No matter what the scenario, in terms of activity level or price, Coinpot is a great way to invest in cryptocurrency without incurring any risk. It’s also great for people that are new to the cryptocurrency world. You don’t have to buy anything or set anything up. It’s all been done for you and it’s all freeAll you need is a computer and an email address. To be clear, not all faucets are like Coinpot, so be careful. The reason I chose Coinpot for this experiment is due to its ease of use and credibility. I’m currently working on a few others and will send out a post when that happens.

How To Sign Up For & Maximize Coinpot Faucets

So now that you see the potential, these are the steps to sign up and get started:

Step 1: Sign up for a Coinpot MicroWallet (https://coinpot.co/)This is a where each faucet will send your “claim”. When you reach your withdrawal minimum, you will want to move your cryptocurrency from your software wallet (CoinPot) to another wallet.

Step 2: Sign up with each of the following faucets. Each one of these faucets are already connected to your Coinpot MicroWallet. As long as you sign up with the same email address you used to sign up for your Coinpot, they are automatically connected. Play around with each faucet a bit to get a feel for how this works. Please use my referral codes to sign up for the faucet.

Moon Bitcoin

Moon Dogecoin

Moon Litecoin

Moon BitcoinCash

MoonDash

Bit Fun

Bonus Bitcoin

Step 3: Optimize your claim amount on each faucet. I’ve modeled out the performance of each faucet.

Each faucet has its own incentive structure. In general, there are two different structures. Your goal is to maximize the claim by paying attention to rewards:

Moon Bitcoin

This is a unique faucet. It pays out in Bitcoin. It is the only incentive structure with 5 different bonus categories. Each bonus category gives you the ability to double your claim amount. It also pays at 50% for referrals. This makes Moon Bitcoin one of the best opportunities in the Coinpot faucet network. In addition to referrals, Moon Bitcoin also rewards the following:

1) Loyalty bonus — Action: make a claim at least once a day. This is the easiest bonus. All you have to do is make a claim every day and you get a bonus. If you miss a day, it resets back to 1 and you have to walk up to 100% again.

2) Referral bonus — Action: refer at least 100 people to take full advantage of the referral bonus.

In addition to getting 50% of your referral’s claims, you also get a 1% bonus for every person you sign up — up to 100%. This bonus has a ceiling of 100 people, but your referral commission does not.

3) Offer Bonus — Action: do 10 offers to take full advantage of the 100% claim bonus. This bonus has a ceiling of 10 offers.

4) Mystery Bonus — Do nothing and earn this bonus.

5) Mining Bonus — Mine on your computer for a 100% bonus depending on your hash rate. This is new.

There’s one other thing that is absolutely critical in your claim amount. This is true for all 6 faucets — the number of times you claim can drastically increase your daily claim amount. For example, based on the current claim rate which is published on the Moon Bitcoin site, if you claim every 5 minutes for 4 weeks you get 16,128 satoshis (assuming no referrals or bonus opportunities). However, if you claim every 4 weeks you get 111 satoshis.

The key to optimizing this faucet is to claim every 25 minutes or so. This is the max out time, not 5 minutes. This may change, but current claim rates show that there is no benefit to claiming at smaller time intervals. You don’t start to make less satoshi until you wait for 30 minutes or more. So you can claim more often, but you won’t make any more than if you claim every 25 minutes (I say 25 because you don’t want to wait until the last minute). This makes MoonBitcoin one of the easier Moon faucets to reach maximum claims on. If you can’t claim every 25 min, at least claim once a day for the loyalty bonus. You want to refer at least 100 people to take advantage of the 50% referral commission and max out on the 1% per referral bonus. You want to do 10 offers to take advantage of the offer bonus. You can also get a bonus for mining on your computer. Focusing on these actions can greatly increase your claims.

Moon Dogecoin

Moon Dogecoin is like Moon Bitcoin, but pays out in Dogecoin. All the Moon faucets have the same basic structure, but not as many bonus options.

1) Loyalty bonus — Action: make a claim at least once a day. This is the easiest bonus. All you have to do is make a claim every day and you get a bonus. If you miss a day, it resets back to 1 and you have to walk up to 100% again.

2) Referral bonus — Action: refer at least 100 people to take full advantage of the referral bonus. In addition to getting 25% (not 50% like Moon Bitcoin) of your referral’s claims, you also get a 1% bonus for every person you sign up — up to 100%. This bonus has a ceiling of 100 people, but your referral commission does not.

3) Mystery Bonus — Do nothing and earn this bonus.

The key to optimizing this faucet is to claim every 25 minutes or so. This is the max out time, not 5 minutes. This may change, but current claim rates show that there is no benefit to claiming at smaller time intervals. You don’t start to make less dogecoin until you wait for 30 minutes or more. So you can claim more often, but you won’t make any more than if you claim every 25 minutes. I say 25 because you don’t want to wait until the last minute. If you can’t claim every 25 min, at least claim once a day for the loyalty bonus. This makes MoonDoge one of the easier Moon faucets to reach maximum claims on. You want to refer at least 100 people to take advantage of the 25% referral commission and max out on the 1% per referral bonus. Focusing on these actions can greatly increase your claims.

Moon Litecoin

Moon Litecoin is the same as Moon Dash (see below), but it pays out in Litecoin. Though it has a similar bonus structure to MoonDoge and MoonBitcoin, it requires more claims to max out.

1) Loyalty bonus — Action: make a claim at least once a day. This is the easiest bonus. All you have to do is make a claim every day and you get a bonus. If you miss a day, it resets back to 1 and you have to walk up to 100% again.

2) Referral bonus — Action: refer at least 100 people to take full advantage of the referral bonus. In addition to getting 25% (not 50% like Moon Bitcoin) of your referral’s claims, you also get a 1% bonus for every person you sign up — up to 100%. This bonus has a ceiling of 100 people, but your referral commission does not.

3) Mystery Bonus — Do nothing and earn this bonus.

The key to optimizing this faucet is to claim at least once a day for the loyalty bonus. To maximize this claim you need to claim every 5 minutes or 288 claims per day which is the highest of any faucet except Moon Dash. This makes MoonLitecoin and MoonDash slightly harder than the other Moon faucets, but not by much. You want to refer at least 100 people to take advantage of the 25% referral commission and max out on the 1% per referral bonus. Focusing on these actions can greatly increase your claims.

MoonCash

Newest faucet. The bonus structure is the same as MoonDoge and MoonLitecoin, but pays out in Bitcoin Cash. You can optimize your daily claims by doing the following:

1) Loyalty bonus — Action: make a claim at least once a day. This is the easiest bonus. All you have to do is make a claim every day and you get a bonus. If you miss a day, it resets back to 1 and you have to walk up to 100% again.

2) Referral bonus — Action: refer at least 100 people to take full advantage of the referral bonus. In addition to getting 25% (not 50% like Moon Bitcoin) of your referral’s claims, you also get a 1% bonus for every person you sign up — up to 100%. This bonus has a ceiling of 100 people, but your referral commission does not.

3) Mystery Bonus — Do nothing and earn this bonus.

The key to optimizing this faucet is to claim every 25 minutes or so. This is the max out time, not 5 minutes. This may change, but current claim rates show that there is no benefit to claiming at smaller time intervals. You don’t start to make less satoshi until you wait for 30 minutes or more. So you can claim more often, but you won’t make any more than if you claim every 25 minutes. I say 25 because you don’t want to wait until the last minute. If you can’t claim every 25 min, at least claim once a day for the loyalty bonus. This makes MoonCash one of the easier Moon faucets to reach maximum claims on. You want to refer at least 100 people to take advantage of the 25% referral commission and max out on the 1% per referral bonus. Focusing on these actions can greatly increase your claims.

MoonDash

MoonDash is the same as MoonLitecoin, but it pays out in Dash.

1) Loyalty bonus — Action: make a claim at least once a day. This is the easiest bonus. All you have to do is make a claim every day and you get a bonus. If you miss a day, it resets back to 1 and you have to walk up to 100% again.

2) Referral bonus — Action: refer at least 100 people to take full advantage of the referral bonus. In addition to getting 25% (not 50% like Moon Bitcoin) of your referral’s claims, you also get a 1% bonus for every person you sign up — up to 100%. This bonus has a ceiling of 100 people, but your referral commission does not.

3) Mystery Bonus — Do nothing and earn this bonus.

The key to optimizing this faucet is to claim as often as you can, at least once a day for the loyalty bonus. To maximize this claim you need to claim every 5 minutes or 288 claims per day which is the highest of any faucet except Moon Dash. This makes MoonLitecoin and MoonDash slightly harder than the other two faucets. You want to refer at least 100 people to take advantage of the 25% referral commission and max out on the 1% per referral bonus. Focusing on these actions can greatly increase your claims.

Bit Fun

Bitfun is slightly different. It pays out in Bitcoin at a higher rate than MoonBitcoin and has no limitations on claim time. You can also play games and do offers. Playing games does not increase faucet amount rate, however.

Referral bonus — Action: refer as many people as possible to take advantage of the 50% commission.

The key to optimizing this faucet is to claim around 4hrs, but there is no loyalty bonus. You want to refer as many people as you can to take advantage of the 50% referral commission. Focusing on these actions can greatly increase your claims.

Bonus Bitcoin

Bonus Bitcoin pays out in Bitcoin. The amount you can claim varies, but you can get a bonus of 5% on all your claims and referrals for the past 3 days as long as you make a claim every day. You can only make a claim every 15 minutes.

Referral bonus — Action: refer as many people as possible to take advantage of the 50% commission.

The key to optimizing this faucet is to claim as often as you can every 15 min. You want to refer as many people as you can to take advantage of the 50% referral commission and the 72 hr loyalty bonus. Focusing on these actions can greatly increase your claims.

STEP 4: FINAL STEP

Take what I’ve written here and make it your own. You have full license to plagiarize all you want. First, replace my referral codes with your own referral codes (please let me know if you need help finding your codes). Send it out to your friends and family. Set up a seminar at your community center or library. Send it out on Facebook/Twitter/Instagram. If you do add additional faucets to your list, be sure to vet them out for your base.

You can look up the price of any cryptocurrency on  https://coinmarketcap.com/.

Final thoughts: Crypto is For Everyone

The world of investments is largely cut off from people that don’t have the means, but crypto isn’t. I have family and friends on both sides of the wealth spectrum and this is a great way for both to accumulate coins. Those that have money, but are worried about Bitcoin’s viability, can use faucets as a no risk way to still participate in the crypto boom. Those that don’t have the money can also use this as a way to participate.

Translation: If you don’t have $1 million (or even $10,000), Coinpot is a great way to build a diversified portfolio of high potential crypto. It is a portfolio strategy in and of itself.

Bitcoin, Bitcoin Cash, Litecoin, Dash and Dogecoin represent a good cross-section of cryptos available on the market today. The only one that’s missing is Ethereum and I’m looking for a good Ethereum faucet to recommend now.

I will also warn that the learning curve for crypto is steep, but you don’t have to know any of that for Coinpot. Coinpot is a wallet and the faucets it supports are already set up to deposit directly into your Coinpot wallet — real time. It couldn’t be any easier.

Update

As a corollary, I wanted to follow up with a very important piece of the crypto puzzle — security. You need to keep your crypto safe — it’s not safe in Coinpot once you make more than the threshold limits.

The threshold limit varies for each coin. According to the website, “Withdrawal requests are processed and paid directly to your wallet within 48 hours.” In my experience, it’s much faster.

These are the current withdrawal threshold limits which can be found on Coinpot when you click on “Withdraw”:

 

Bitcoin — 10,000 satoshi (.00010000)

Bitcoin Cash — 10,000 satoshi (.00010000)

Litecoin — 200,000 latoshi (.00200000)

Dash — 20,000 duffs (.00020000)

Dogecoin — 50 dogecoin — side note: you can only withdraw dogecoin to a dogecoin wallet (for free). Then you can transfer to your main wallet.

 

Once you reach the threshold, you should withdraw your coin to a safe wallet.

I have made a comprehensive list of wallets, (as well as exchanges, additional verified faucets, and other sources to make this venture safe, quick and well organized).

http://www.markethive.net/faucet/

Once you decide on one of these wallets, you need to follow that wallet’s instructions for receiving or depositing funds. These instructions are very important — do not skip this part.

Your new wallet will give you an address in order to deposit funds. Each address is specific to a certain coin. In other words, you have a different address for each coin. Copy the address and put it in the “withdrawal box” in Coinpot. You want to copy your address and put it in the box.

You’re not done yet. Once you make this request, Coinpot will send you a verification email to confirm your request as an extra layer of security. If you don’t click the link, the withdrawal will not occur.

The upgrade to the list of faucets:

On the same link above you will also see a well-organized and researched list of faucets. They are sorted by time to complete and have a built in timer so as to make managing this a lot easier.

The Coinpot faucets are identified in a Sky Blue as the illustration reveals.

We have frequent live workshops on this. They are listed on our Markethive calendar in the back office and also open to the public at http://aboutco.in

Thomas Prendergast
Founder
Markethive

Thomas Prendergast

Digital Marketing In The Age Of Virtual And Augmented Reality

Digital Marketing In The Age Of Virtual And Augmented Reality

Digital marketing has seen a massive upswing in the past decade,

with search engines and social platforms delivering millions of sponsored messages from advertisers every minute of every day. The competitive nature of advertising has, however, created a new problem in which advertisers are seeing diminishing returns on every advertising dollar, causing their overall ROI figures to drop significantly. This has opened the door for novel technologies like augmented reality and virtual reality to enter the arena as untapped advertising options.

Digital marketers are well aware of the limitations that current digital display ads are facing. These challenges include ad blockers and a growing intolerance from users toward digital adverts. A 2017 report by PageFair showed that ad blocking was up 30% between 2015 and 2016, and some 615 million devices were blocking ads as of December 2016. This trend is expected to continue to rise. Consider Adobe Digital Insights’ 2017 report, which shows that internet advertising costs are up 12% over a three-year period. This increase is five times higher than inflation, meaning that companies are paying more for advertisements that are reaching fewer people.

Augmented Reality Basics

Augmented reality has been utilized by global heavyweight Coca-Cola, which recently kicked off a new AR campaign with Alipay to help celebrate Chinese New Year. Other big players that have experimented with AR include Nivea, Starbucks and Volkswagen. The efficacy of these campaigns remains debatable, though, as many consumers see this avenue as more of a gimmick or novelty than a legitimate advertising tool.

Global augmented reality advertising spend (paywall) tells a different story, however. These figures show an almost 100% jump in spending, from $6.6 billion in 2016 to $12.8 billion in 2017. When we look at projected trends (paywall) for both AR and VR technologies combined between 2016 and 2020, the figure skyrockets to a potential $215 billion in 2021 if adoption rates are high. The best current example is the runaway success the mobile AR game Pokémon Go experienced in mid-2016. The popularity of this game led to partnership deals with Sprint, McDonald's and Starbucks.

AR technology is currently in its infancy, with large players such as Microsoft, Apple and Google only now working on the first iteration of devices and software development. Manufacturers are expecting wearable AR tech to be the next big thing, with products like Microsoft’s HoloLens and Intel’s Vaunt looking to integrate people’s digital lives more effortlessly than ever before. Google’s web AR initiative removes current barriers that are present in the existing AR frameworks. Even Apple is rumored to be working on wearable technology.

Virtual Reality Basics

VR is an immersive form of digital entertainment. Sensors allow head movement to alter content to give users the impression of perspective and motion, and the end result is eerily realistic. Another spin-off technology that has emerged thanks to VR implementations is 360 video, which is where the majority of VR advertising efforts will likely be aimed in the future. Some automotive manufacturers, including the likes of Audi and Porsche, have already begun offering their clients a VR showroom experience that allows customers to view the interiors of their vehicles in different configurations and colors.

The biggest hurdle that VR manufacturers have to clear is that of pricing, which will ultimately decide how accessible the technology will be for future consumers. VR hardware in its current form is prohibitively expensive for the majority of consumers, with a price tag of $300-$600, not including additional gaming consoles or PCs. The technology’s price tag still makes items like these far from accessible for the average consumer, but in the near future this will change, just as the personal computer did in the 1990s.

The Future Of VR And AR

The most important challenge that the new VR/AR world will hold for advertisers is ad placement. There will be no place for display ads, no video pre-rolls and no header bidding, so if those are no longer in play, where will the ads be placed? How will the publisher make money, and how will the advertiser gain traffic? As the technology catches up with the vision of advertising within VR and AR gaming environments, we will start to see more engaging and interactive advertising content being pushed to consumers. Traditional billboards will give way to AR-designated spaces, allowing 3D content to be streamed directly to consumers, while specially created VR content will start to appear in online games in the form of in-game advertising.

To understand just how much VR advertisement and placement will change, imagine this scenario: You are online at your favorite virtual jazz bar. You look across the table and see your friend drinking a cold beer. At that exact moment, the AI system will recognize that beer and make a purchase suggestion to you. You will then be prompted with a one-hour delivery option of that same brand of beer via Amazon drone, and a simple yes or no will complete the transaction or cancel it. Another scenario will have you playing your favorite virtual reality game or watching a movie, and AI software installed in your virtual reality hardware will determine the best possible product placement for a bottle of Coke or Pepsi (depending on the market demographic that you happen to fall under) within the movie/game frame — seamlessly.

This is a lot to digest, but there is a brave new world of marketing and advertising waiting just behind the next curve in the road. Are you ready for it?

Chuck Reynolds


Marketing Dept
Contributor

Please click either Link to learn more about Marketing.
Interested or have Questions, Call Me, 559-474-4614

Thomas Prendergast

Bitcoin Will Be World’s Leading Currency in 10 Years: Square CEO Jack Dorsey

Bitcoin Will Be World’s Leading Currency in 10 Years: Square CEO Jack Dorsey


One of Silicon Valley’s most revered entrepreneurs is going all in on Bitcoin.

Square CEO Jack Dorsey, who is in London this week promoting the digital payments firm, told The Times that he believes Bitcoin could become the world’s leading currency within a decade —

or perhaps even sooner.

“The world ultimately will have a single currency, the internet will have a single currency. I personally believe that it will be bitcoin,” Dorsey said, adding that it would occur “probably over ten years, but it could go faster”.

As CCN reported, Square has added support for simple Bitcoin trading into the firm’s popular Cash App, and Dorsey has said that the company intends to add more Bitcoin-related functionality in the future. This has led to speculation that Square may begin handling Bitcoin payments in its merchant payment processing software or perhaps even launch a full-fledged cryptocurrency exchange.

Dorsey — who also leads social media giant Twitter — conceded that Bitcoin in its present state of development is not an “effective currency,” citing slow confirmation times and high transaction fees (although fees are currently at a relative low point). Nevertheless, he expressed optimism about technologies that will make Bitcoin payments more user-friendly and

efficient in the near future.

“It’s slow and it’s costly, but as more and more people have it, those things go away. There are newer technologies that build off of blockchain and make it more approachable,” he said, it “does not have the capabilities right now to become an effective currency”.

One of those technologies, presumably, is the Lightning Network (LN), a second-layer scaling solution that allows users to open off-blockchain payment channels and execute near-instant transactions with virtually no fees. Dorsey, notably, recently invested in Lightning Labs one of the leading development teams focused on programming LN software. Earlier this month, Lightning Labs released lnd 0.4-beta, which is the first LN implementation to receive a beta release.

Chuck Reynolds


Marketing Dept
Contributor

Please click either Link to learn more about Bitcoin.
Interested or have Questions, Call Me, 559-474-4614

Thomas Prendergast

What Big Tech’s Ban Might Mean for Cryptocurrency Advertising

What Big Tech’s Ban Might Mean for Cryptocurrency Advertising

How might the Google, Facebook and Twitter cryptocurrency advertising ban affect the industry?

Following Facebook’s lead, Google has announced it will ban all cryptocurrency advertising on its platforms by June 2018. This restriction applies to all Google-owned platforms including YouTube and any websites where Google sells digital ad space. On Sunday, March 18, 2018, Sky News reported Twitter will ban a range of cryptocurrency advertising by April 2018, including advertising for initial coin offerings, cryptocurrency wallets and some cryptocurrency exchanges. Twitter has not publicly communicated the ban nor has it denied the report.

As Matthew Frankel with the Motley Fool suggests, the main purpose of Google’s ban could be to protect investors without harming those already currently involved in the industry for the sake of positive development of the blockchain technology business ecosystem as a whole. Still, the reasoning and repercussions of this ban are worth investigating further. While straightforward in delivery, the announcement itself has far-reaching implications for advertisers in the cryptocurrency space. The instance also leaves others with one more example to gauge Google’s position of power, responsibility and liability over online communication.

The news came as part of Google Adwords’ annual “trust and safety” report in the form of a new policy “to restrict the advertisement of Contracts of Difference, rolling spot forex and financial spread betting” — all speculative high-risk methods for generating greater amounts of profit in the short term with a low barrier of entry. Because cryptocurrency has always been associated with financial volatility and has more recently become a hot-button topic in finance and technology in general, understanding why Google has banned these other financial products might indicate a more rational consideration for the ban.

Specifically, the update stated that advertisements for “cryptocurrencies and related content (including but not limited to initial coin offerings, cryptocurrency exchanges, wallets and cryptocurrency trading advice) will no longer be served.” While the statement goes on to say that certain Contracts of Difference, rolling spot forex and financial spread betting can be authorized to advertise through Adwords in certain countries based on Google’s certification, there is no mention of cryptocurrencies. Finally, “Advertisers can request certification with Google starting March 2018 when the application form is published.”

Blanket Approach

Bitcoin Magazine spoke with Rick Hanna, a digital strategist with BTC Inc, to better understand the situation. According to Hanna, setting the update (bans are not typical) ahead of time, for June 2018, is typical of Google Adwords updates and changes. “It gives their developers and end users time to implement and adjust for the changes. And a lot of cryptocurrency advertisers will be using Google and Facebook for the time being until it closes.”

For Hanna, based on past behavior, the most atypical thing about Facebook and Google’s announcements is the “blanket approach” which bans all cryptocurrency advertising: “Blanket approach raises eyebrows because you recognize how much they act as gatekeepers. A blanket ban seems a bit heavy-handed to squash a few bad eggs.” Hanna recognized that other social media platforms such as LinkedIn, Medium and Reddit will be used more often unless they follow suit.

Reasons and Repercussions  

Tatiana Moroz is the founder of Crypto Media Hub, a consultancy specializing in advertising, PR, marketing and events for the cryptocurrency space since 2015, with clients like Vaultoro, Blockfinity and Zencash. While her company targets mainly publisher advertising, whether that be through website banner ads and original content or on events, rather than on Google or Facebook, Moroz helped to articulate big tech’s thinking for the ban as well as potential repercussions for companies who rely on various advertising platforms to get their message across.

“This is not intended to sound conspiratorial in any way, but I think that Facebook and Google are very large corporations embedded in the establishment system,” Moroz told Bitcoin Magazine. “They get a lot of benefit from that system. That has been proven with the way they censor their users and the way they exploit their users by incorrectly selling their information. When I look at their policy on cryptocurrency, I think that it’s a disruptive technology that could potentially eat their lunch.”

On the other hand, Moroz also admitted that these same corporations have valid concern with regard to liability: “The SEC regulation around cryptocurrency has been somewhat unclear in an ever-evolving landscape, so, by allowing cryptocurrency advertisements, they might be opening themselves up to legal liability without necessarily knowing it.”

Separating the Wheat From the Chaff

Even for media and marketing companies that specialize in cryptocurrency, filtering potential clients through a vetting process that weeds out scams or potential pump-and-dump projects can be a difficult process that must constantly be redefined. From this perspective, the prospect of laying down a blanket approach to banning all cryptocurrency advertisements may be the easiest way to save time, while eliminating liability and mitigating the responsibility of imposing an evaluation framework that could stunt the industry or appear in any way, shape or form as collusion.

However, the reality of the power which both Facebook and Google hold over the digital world means that even if they are attempting to mitigate their responsibility for something as new and unpredictable as cryptocurrency, banning cryptocurrency advertising is still a method by which they are able to choose the players who can (or cannot) grow their businesses through digital advertising. According to an eMarketer article from last year, together, Google and Facebook were expected to control 63.1 percent of U.S. digital ad investment by the end of 2017.

Art, Not Science

“As a marketing company, it’s very difficult to choose which projects to work on,” admitted Moroz. “It can be an intimidating process for everyone, but I do believe that there needs to be some way to figure out whether a company is real. On the other hand, I am not a venture capitalist or lawyer so I can’t necessarily gauge each [project’s] ability to be successful.”

“We try to be selective with who we work with, but knowing about legitimacy is an ongoing problem within this space. I don’t think Google is in any position to be able to gauge that better, so, on a case-by-case basis, that may be difficult for people at this time.” It should be noted that when considering how to separate legitimate cryptocurrency companies from scams, it is not often so black and white — most companies fall somewhere in the middle. As a result, it may not always be easy to distinguish illegal activity from mere mediocrity or incompetence.

Cryptocurrency Advertising in a Post-Google and Facebook World

Assuming that Google, Twitter and Facebook’s cryptocurrency advertising ban is here to stay, cryptocurrency and, to an extent, blockchain technology companies in general will be facing new challenges when it comes to promoting their brands and getting customers without the help of three of the internet’s largest corporations.

“I definitely expect to see some blowback from the crypto-community since social media has become the primary channel for communications in this very new market,” said Swan Burrus, a strategist with OgilvyOne Worldwide. Burrus also speculated as to whether further restrictions on these same platforms could be placed on bounty programs which incentivize support and promotion for specific cryptocurrencies. Moroz, on the other hand, believes filling the space left by the absence of advertising on search engine and social media platforms will result in higher quality interactions through community involvement and

relationship building.

I think it is going to become even more focused on relationships and finding trusted partners who can help them navigate the space. If you can’t necessarily afford an agency to do that, it would be worthwhile to at least do research or talk to people who have gone through that process. Projects can always go to different communities or cryptocurrency publishers that they trust for advertising.

Though going through the internet’s biggest online players will likely present advertisers the largest opportunity to receive the most impressions per ad, other organizations who work for cryptocurrency companies have found that it is not always best. According to Shane Jordan, vice president of strategic insights at Spark Public Relations, Google and Facebook play a much more peripheral role than one

would first think:

In our experience and data results, the Google and Facebook ad networks have not proved to be a significant driver of conversion and, thus, in past campaigns we have only included Google and FB ads as a very small percentage of the advertising media mix.

With the understanding that advertisers who use data will build ad campaigns around those places on the internet where performance measures highest, Jordan said his team works more often with publishers. “We've found that the best performing channels have been direct display advertising on targeted websites where we know crypto-investors get their news and market insights — and this is where we will continue to focus our efforts."

At the industry’s early stage, there is still clear disconnect or misconception between where advertising should place ads and where their customers want to see them. Joking on the complicated yet fascinating dynamic of the cryptocurrency and blockchain technology space on an episode of his podcast, Cointalk, writer Jay Kang aptly summarizes an ideal future for cryptocurrency that many will

continue to work toward:

What we really want is an atmosphere where you can make a good faith investment in a project because you think that the project has merit and potential for whatever reason. And that it is not going to be overrun by scammers, that theses shady things will not happen to them, that the exchange where they keep their money will not get hacked. And we’ll eventually get there.

Chuck Reynolds


Marketing Dept
Contributor

Please click either Link to learn more about Bitcoin.
Interested or have Questions, Call Me, 559-474-4614

Thomas Prendergast

Facebook pilots program to help creators build advertiser relationships & drive fan engagement

Facebook pilots program to help creators build advertiser relationships & drive fan engagement

The site is testing new products that will allow creators to spotlight their top fans and monetize content.


Facebook is taking steps to make its network more appealing

to content creators and influencers by piloting a product testing program built around creator needs. Scheduled to roll out over the coming weeks to a small group, the experimental features are aimed at driving more fan engagement for creators and helping them create revenue from their Facebook activitites.

“We’ve been working closely with creators to understand what they need to be successful on Facebook,” write Facebook’s Vice President of Product Fidji Simo and the company’s Head of Entertainment Partnerships Sibyl Goldman. “To support them, we’re focused on three areas: helping them engage and grow their community, manage their presence, and build a business on Facebook.”  To start, Facebook is experimenting with two different revenue-generating tools. One will allow creators to shop themselves to advertisers and brands for branded-content opportunities. Facebook says creators that are part of the pilot program will be able to build out a portfolio spotlighting their area of expertise.

Advertisers will then be able to search the portfolios and find creators to partner with for branded content campaigns. Another revenue-creating opportunity being tested is a monthly payment option where fans can pay creators to get access to exclusive content and a badge that identifies them as a top fan. Displayed next to a user’s name, the badge will also be available to highly engaged fans. “As we continue to help creators build relationships with their audiences, we’re going to make it easier to identify and connect with their most passionate fans,” Simo and Goldman write.

Facebook says users can earn top-fan badge status based on how often they engage with a creator through comments, shares, reactions, video views and interactions with the creator. Fans have to opt in to get the badge and can turn it off at any time. Highly engaged fans will also be included on a leaderboard listing a creator’s most engaged fans. Regarding creator tools, Facebook says it is testing a content rights management tool designed specifically for creators. “This new version of our Rights Manager tool includes simplified and more automated capabilities,” writes Simo and Goldman.

Also, already available on iOS devices, the Facebook Creator App is scheduled to come to Android devices soon. Facebook’s move to up its game for creators comes on the heels of Snapchat’s announcement last week that it was testing a new feature to let users tag other users in their Snapchat story — giving influencers and brands more ways to build their follower numbers. “Creators are vibrant, diverse, and wonderful at building community, bringing people from across the world together around shared passions,” says Simo — getting at the heart of Facebook’s strategy to attract more influencers to its platform.

Chuck Reynolds


Marketing Dept
Contributor

Please click either Link to learn more about Marketing.
Interested or have Questions, Call Me, 559-474-4614

Thomas Prendergast

Messenger Marketing: The Next Frontier for Business Growth

Messenger Marketing:
The Next Frontier for Business Growth

Opinion:
Traditional channels such as emails and SMS are vulnerable to spam

A perfect storm of market forces

is leading to the emergence of messenger marketing as the next big frontier for business growth. The growth of mobile messaging, combined with the saturation of other media, is leading to the migration of both consumers and marketers to messaging applications.

Traditional channels such as emails and SMS are vulnerable to spam. Users have limited ability to control who can send them messages, leading to excessive emails, overloaded inboxes and user anxiety. In a way, email and SMS have become victims of their own success. In marketing terms, this translates into lower open rates and read rates and even lower click-through rates. Messaging apps, on the other hand, give users substantial control over who can send messages to them. Businesses need user permission before communicating with them, and users can opt in or out at any time.

While this may initially appear as a barrier to marketers, it actually works out well for most businesses. The spammers are locked out of the ecosystem, leading to fewer messages and manageable inboxes. This translates to higher open rates, read rates and CTRs. Studies show that messaging apps have open rates, read rates and CTRs as much as 10 time those of email and SMS. Messaging apps are immensely popular. With the rise of mobile devices, usage has grown tremendously, even surpassing social media.

Messaging apps represent the most popular use of mobile devices. If consumers can talk to their friends and family through messaging apps, they expect to be able to talk to businesses and brands in the same way. Messaging apps enable marketers to meet consumers on their own turf, on their own terms. The specific app may vary based on geography and context, but apps such as Facebook Messenger, WhatsApp, WeChat, Line, Slack, Skype, Telegram, etc. are all viable channels for businesses to engage with their customers. In fact, they have all recently added features in their apps to enable business-to-consumer communication.

Messenger marketing is short and sweet. Instead of long-form email newsletters, users receive a short message, almost like a tweet. Consumers in general are getting used to shorter and on-point messages in their personal communication, and they expect the same in their business communication, as well. Attention spans are getting shorter, and messaging marketing leverages the same trend to enable more interesting marketing messages. Messenger marketing is conversational. Instead of just sending a plain message or notification, the brand can actually engage in a conversation with the user. The user can ask a question about an offer and get specific, accurate and instant responses.

Messenger marketing can leverage artificial-intelligence-enabled chat bots that can make the whole experience far more natural and interesting to the user. Conversational chat bots enable the marketer to deeply personalize the user experience: It’s like having a private, one-on-one conversation with every customer. It is important that the conversational tone is such that the marketer talks with the customer rather than to the customer. Marketers that want to leverage messenger marketing need to focus on the three Cs: communities, campaigns and conversations.

The marketer first needs to get the user’s permission to send messages by building a community of subscribers. These opt-ins can be acquired by integrating links into existing marketing channels such as websites, digital ads, social media pages or even billboards and print ads. Then, the marketer can run campaigns to engage these customers. These campaigns may be specific promotions or ongoing engagement activities. Along the way, the marketer can also profile and tag specific users to further optimize their future campaigns.

Lastly, each outbound message is not the end of the campaign, but in fact the start of a conversation. These messages can include clickable, interactive elements that enable the user to get more information. The user may have an unstructured query that may or may not be related to the last message. Either way, the marketer can set up AI-enabled chat bots to automate these conversations.

Messenger marketing is a new emerging frontier, but it is poised to be one of the most significant marketing channels going forward. It has the ability to scale gracefully without getting overloaded with spam unlike email and SMS. Marketers should start focusing on messenger marketing now—the rewards are many for the early movers.

Chuck Reynolds


Marketing Dept
Contributor

Please click either Link to learn more about Marketing.
Interested or have Questions, Call Me, 559-474-4614

Thomas Prendergast

Southern California needs a better marketing strategy

Southern California needs a better marketing strategy

Largely invented, a semi-desert far from the metropolitan heartland of the nation,

Southern California has relied on a combination of engineering genius and marketing bravado. The constructed infrastructure has become creaky, but still functions. Not so our sense of marketing our region to the rest of the world — and ourselves. In its earliest decades, the Los Angeles region merchandised itself aggressively, but the product largely sold itself by showing off its natural beauty and uniquely wonderful climate at events like the Rose Bowl. The area’s domination of music, movies and television and its tech-based business community — notably aerospace — solidified its standing as among the world’s most vibrant regions.

Now that marketing savvy and business acumen seems largely missing. Once a magnet for migrants, both domestic and foreign, the region has become one of the leading exporters of people to other, physically less attractive places. A region that both created giant companies, and lured others here, is now increasingly devoid of powerful, locally based companies.

Poor positioning and its consequences

“In the end, cities are competing globally for population, students, cultural events, corporations, ventures and live entertainment,” notes Brookings’ fellow Greg Clark. To succeed, a city needs to “align existing events and marketing with an agreed-upon common story; train citizens and civic leaders to be champions of that story; and review progress annually to develop additional approaches.”

The region’s massive creative assets should make us well positioned to accomplish a good sales job. But increasingly, other regions — New York, Chicago, Seattle, San Diego and the Bay Area — have surpassed us in telling their stories. San Diego, for example, has created a video that has been viewed over two million times, almost ten times more than ads produced to attract people to Los Angeles. Orange County does even worse. Irvine-based Blizzard created its own quality video for attracting potential employees to the company, notes company HR director Jesse Meschuk, due to a lack of usable marketing materials.

Not surprisingly, given our poor marketing, the area is not viewed as an attractive place for professionals. We recently conducted a survey of 1,200 professional for a study of Orange County and found that the OC was viewed as only a mediocre place by such people from outside the region; Los Angeles, the area’s linchpin, did even worse. Remarkably, San Diego, which shares climate, topography and dispersed urban form with the rest of Southern California, did best, followed by Denver, Charlotte, and Seattle.

Selling ourselves

The L.A. region’s weak image also reflects a chronically disorganized, poorly motivated business community. “You have to work really hard to create a network here,” laments Andree Beringia, founder and CEO of Irvine based CIE Digital Labs. “There is no ecosystem. If you are not aggressive, this is a hard place to build a company. Right now, nobody is building that system.”

In other places networking is facilitated by strong “go to” organizations like Joint Venture Silicon Valley, San Diego’s Connect, or similar groups in the North Carolina and Austin regions. In the Southland local business organs often appear marginal and ineffective, although special interests, like downtown developers, often wield power in pursuit of narrow agendas.

To this add a distinct lack of originality. The old generation of business and political leaders, while often arrogant, and even malicious, sold Southern California as uniquely adaptable and original. Now, our leadership often seeks to mindlessly emulate others, such calls to develop “a Silicon Valley South,” or the L.A.-led attempt to duplicate Manhattan with dense housing and mass transit dominance.

Building on who we are – and being proud of it

Such efforts are misguided and ultimately doomed. A spate of large tech companies will not suddenly develop in this environment, despite the sporadic emergence of a media tech company like Snapchat, and the genius ideas of Elon Musk, or even the relocation to L.A. of Valley venture magnate Peter Thiel. If Silicon Valley has a real rival, it is well-networked Seattle area or even Austin.

Similarly, efforts to create a faux New York are, if anything, even more misplaced. Transit ridership, despite billions expended, is falling throughout the region. Downtown may be glitzier than before but is no economic powerhouse along the lines of San Francisco, much less Manhattan.

Southern California’s future lies elsewhere, in developing a message based on what we can reasonably hope to become. Our unique strengths in lifestyle innovation and entrepreneurship can foster continual creative experimentation that can drive our economy forward. We must focus, as always, on our ability to improvise, drawing on our creative strengths, sharing that knowledge not only with the rest of world, but, arguably more importantly, with ourselves.

Chuck Reynolds


Marketing Dept
Contributor

Please click either Link to learn more about Marketing.
Interested or have Questions, Call Me, 559-474-4614

Thomas Prendergast

Ways Blockchain Can Boost Brand Marketing

Ways Blockchain Can Boost Brand Marketing

They can increase ROI and improve potential customer outreach

Blockchain would be a success story in marketing

and advertising if the industry determined how to harness its decentralized and distributed ledger concepts, but that’s something that has yet to happen. Speaking about blockchain in 2018 is similar to speaking about internet routers and switches in 1998. Those technologies were critically important to the development of the internet, but most users don’t think twice about them when doing a Google search today. In order for blockchain to see any mainstream success in marketing and advertising, the technology needs to be enmeshed into the inner workings of new offerings. Here are some ways advertisers and marketers need to start using blockchain to increase their ROI, adhere to changing regulations and better target customers and prospects.

Ad fraud

Marketers struggle with the fact that 50–60 percent of clicks are bots. They should be able to verify the identity of a real human on the other end of an ad, allowing for more direct ROI calculations. But bringing this concept to scale has not yet been proven possible. Marketers can combine blockchain solutions and a robust onboarding process to verify the entity that’s actually clicking on an ad, increasing ROI and reducing fraudulent clicks. In order to verify that the data being written to the blockchain is not fraudulent, you need a rigorous ingestion process to ensure the data is valid before it is written to the blockchain.

In the B2B context, this could include proof of incorporation (UCC filings) or proof of ownership of a range of IP addresses (for corporate offices). In theory, data verification on a blockchain would require a similar onboarding process to getting a driver’s license, requiring multiple verification points and procedures to verify identity initially.

Privacy

Privacy is a paramount concern for B2B companies trying to reach individuals within a business. With laws like the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) looming and multiple state and national privacy laws already in place, it will become increasingly difficult for marketers and advertisers to legally collect information to use in their targeting.Marketers and advertisers need to offer enough value to the customer that they willingly volunteer information on their interests.

Marketers can stay ahead of the ever-changing regulatory curve by using blockchain to geofence data. Here, blockchain acts like a digital rights management (DRM) system. A smart contract residing on the blockchain will include certain rights and privileges, like where the data is allowed to be used, where it can’t be used, where you can store it and so on. Users then directly opt into those choices, and data is collected according to those agreed-upon rules. This means that marketers and advertisers need to offer enough value to the customer that they willingly volunteer information on their interests. Businesses need to be thinking about this now; it is so different than the way programmatic advertising has typically been run. If customers see they are no longer receiving value from making their data available, they have no reason to leave it open and accessible.

Customer identity

Blockchain, along with more granular first-party data, allows buyers and sellers to become more directly connected. The challenge in a B2B context is tying an individual buyer to the company for which they work, allowing B2B businesses to interact with these high-value individuals. Marketers can begin identifying individuals using a public key on the blockchain. That key can then be used along with a unique business identifier in order to track the potential prospect and their buying behavior. This allows B2B companies to track a person in the context of their business so that the actions for that account can be easily traced.

While blockchain is still in its infancy in the marketing and advertising space, it will provide multiple benefits once companies figure out how to harness its power. And like the technologies that came before it, all it’s going to take is one big success story to propel blockchain into modern day marketing use. Marketers can start by using blockchain to prevent fraud, adhere to regulatory changes and identify verified users, all things that will boost your ROI.

Chuck Reynolds


Marketing Dept
Contributor

Please click either Link to learn more about Marketing.
Interested or have Questions, Call Me, 559-474-4614

Thomas Prendergast